Tuesday, November 11, 2014

LGBTQ in Aegis yearbook: a test case for Ateneo de Manila as Catholic University

We read in Guidon that transgenders want to appear as female when they are male and vice versa:
THE AEGIS Editorial Board (EB) and the Aegis Administrative Board (AB) have reached an official resolution regarding transgender representation in the yearbook, but they have not yet disclosed it to interdisciplinary studies senior Rica Salomon, said Aegis EB Editor-in-Chief (EIC) Kristine Estioko. Salomon started an online campaign to allow transgender students to appear in the gender they identify with in the Ateneo yearbook, Aegis. The petition addressed to the Aegis AB was created on September 4 and has 504 signatures as of press time. Aegis is an organization that manages the creation and release of the annual yearbook; the Aegis AB is comprised of Loyola Schools administrators who approve the plans of Aegis’ student arm, the Aegis EB. Estioko also said that Aegis is still deliberating if it is necessary to publicly announce their decision.
One cannot clamor for a right when it is wrong.  When you were born, the nurse or doctor only has a simple criterion to determine if you are male or female and that is by looking at your genital organ.  When you die and an alien studies your DNA samples, he will simply conclude that you are either male or female depending on your X and Y chromosomes.

The LGBT will use this issue as a test case.  If they win this one, they shall bring up another case.  And before you know it, you'll have an office in Ateneo de Manila University dedicated to LGBTQ affairs, which is repugnant to the nature of Ateneo as a Catholic University.  But then, Georgetown University, a fellow Jesuit University, already has an LGBTQ Resource Center.  Here is my prediction: Ateneo shall publicly apologize to the LGBTQ community for marginalizing its members in the Aegis yearbook and assuage their feelings by founding an LGBTQ Resource Center just like in Georgetown University.

I wouldn't be surprised if this happens.  Ateneo already caved in before to contraception and the RH Bill.  All it needed then was a few faculty members who claimed that they support the RH Law in good conscience as private individuals and yet put Ateneo de Manila University as their affiliations.  The Ateneo administration left them unchecked.  The Catholic Educational Association of the Philippines (CEAP) tuned a blind eye.  And the bishops did not impose the canonical discipline. As a result, the number of faculty who signed the position paper for the RH Bill increased.  And faculty members, being role models, influenced their students to make similar position statements for the RH Law.  As Mr. Miyagi said in Karate Kid: "No such thing as bad student, only bad teacher."

Let us ponder again on the grave role of teachers in a Catholic University as outlined stated in Pope John Paul II's encyclical, Ex Corde Ecclesiae:
§ 1. The responsibility for maintaining and strengthening the Catholic identity of the University rests primarily with the University itself. While this responsibility is entrusted principally to university authorities (including, when the positions exist, the Chancellor and/or a Board of Trustees or equivalent body), it is shared in varying degrees by all members of the university community, and therefore calls for the recruitment of adequate university personnel, especially teachers and administrators, who are both willing and able to promote that identity. The identity of a Catholic University is essentially linked to the quality of its teachers and to respect for Catholic doctrine. It is the responsibility of the competent Authority to watch over these two fundamental needs in accordance with what is indicated in Canon Law(49). 
§ 2. All teachers and all administrators, at the time of their appointment, are to be informed about the Catholic identity of the Institution and its implications, and about their responsibility to promote, or at least to respect, that identity. 
§ 3. In ways appropriate to the different academic disciplines, all Catholic teachers are to be faithful to, and all other teachers are to respect, Catholic doctrine and morals in their research and teaching. In particular, Catholic theologians, aware that they fulfil a mandate received from the Church, are to be faithful to the Magisterium of the Church as the authentic interpreter of Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition(50). 
§ 4. Those university teachers and administrators who belong to other Churches, ecclesial communities, or religions, as well as those who profess no religious belief, and also all students, are to recognize and respect the distinctive Catholic identity of the University. In order not to endanger the Catholic identity of the University or Institute of Higher Studies, the number of non-Catholic teachers should not be allowed to constitute a majority within the Institution, which is and must remain Catholic.
Oh, what a grave responsibility it is to be a teacher in a Catholic University!  As Christ said:
Therefore, whoever breaks one of the least of these commandments and teaches others to do so will be called least in the kingdom of heaven. But whoever obeys and teaches these commandments will be called greatest in the kingdom of heaven. (Mt 5:19)
The Ateneo de Manila University: 150 Years of Engaging the Nation
The Ateneo de Manila University: 150 Years of Engaging the Nation
New Hope for Catholic Higher Education: Ex Corde Ecclesiae - A Lay Perspective
New Hope for Catholic Higher Education: Ex Corde Ecclesiae - A Lay Perspective
Making Gay Okay: How Rationalizing Homosexual Behavior Is Changing Everything
Making Gay Okay: How Rationalizing Homosexual Behavior Is Changing Everything
The Homosexual Agenda: Exposing the Principal Threat to Religious Freedom Today
The Homosexual Agenda: Exposing the Principal Threat to Religious Freedom Today