Sunday, November 17, 2013

Philippine Disasters Archive: A proposal for open-access and open-submission in the arxiv.org model

Cultures of Disaster: Society and Natural Hazard in the Philippines
Cultures of Disaster: Society and Natural Hazard in the Philippines
The Philippines is the most disaster-prone area in the world with typhoons, earthquakes, volcanoes, fish kills, epidemics, storm surges, oil spills, etc. becoming almost a part of daily life.  What we need right now is a journal that would document all the case studies and researches from all disciplines: mathematical, physical, biological, social, psychological, and historical sciences. And even researches from government, business, industries, and the church.  What we want is a journal that shall document experiences, failed policies, best practices, legislations, because only in documenting things can Philippines learn from the mistakes of the past disasters and become more pro-active and efficient in disaster preparation, response, and post-disaster rehabilitation.

In this regard, I propose that the Philippine government creates a Philippine Disasters Archive.  It's an open-access online journal and works like the arxiv.org model.  Registered authors may submit articles and moderators simply classify papers according to proper areas This means there is no strict peer-review system:

Open Access (MIT Press Essential Knowledge)
Open Access (MIT Press Essential Knowledge)

Although the arXiv is not peer reviewed, a collection of moderators for each area review the submissions and may recategorize any that are deemed off-topic. The lists of moderators for many sections of the arXiv are publicly available[11] but moderators for most of the physics sections remain unlisted. 
Additionally, an "endorsement" system was introduced in January 2004 as part of an effort to ensure content that is relevant and of interest to current research in the specified disciplines. The new system has attracted its own share of criticism for allegedly restricting inquiry. Under the system, an author must first get endorsed. Endorsement comes from either another arXiv author who is an endorser or is automatic, depending on various evolving criteria, which are not publicly spelled out. Endorsers are not asked to review the paper for errors, but to check if the paper is appropriate for the intended subject area. New authors from recognized academic institutions generally receive automatic endorsement, which in practice means that they do not need to deal with the endorsement system at all. (Wikipedia)
Researches on disasters that received government funding will be required to be uploaded on the Archive. But what we wish to happen is not to compel people to submit their works to the Archive, but rather to convince them that submission to the Archive gives their works greater audience and may, in fact, influence government, business, and educational policies.

Scholarship in the Digital Age: Information, Infrastructure, and the Internet
Scholarship in the Digital Age: Information, Infrastructure, and the Internet
Alternatively, if the government does not wish to take the initiative in the creation of the Philippine Disasters Archive, a consortium of Philippine Universities led perhaps by Ateneo de Manila University, University of the Philippines, and De La Salle University can take the initiative using the Cornell University model:
The operation of arXiv is currently funded by Cornell University Library. In 2010, Cornell has sought to broaden the financial funding of the project by asking institutions to make annual voluntary contributions based on the amount of downloading utilization by each institution. Annual donations will vary in size between $2,300 to $4,000, based on each institution’s usage. As of 16 February 2010, 27 institutions have pledged support on this basis.[8] The annual budget for arXiv is $400,000 for 2010.
(Wikipedia)